Jekyll and Hyde responses

Please post your Jekyll and Hyde answers in the comments below.

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4 comments on “Jekyll and Hyde responses
  1. tiegan says:

    Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

    Throughout The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Stevenson references fear and mystery and mystery but is able to create it with descriptions of the settings. This method can be seen through “a certain sinister block of building”, this description is thrown in amongst the description of a street that “pleased the eye of the passenger” and a mystery is created because there is a question as to why that house doesn’t replicate the ones in the surrounding area. The adjective “sinister” instantly gives off negative connotations and joins the semantic field of evil, the concept of evil often installs a sense of fear in people because there is this feeling of not knowing what it can do. It is referred to as a “block of building” and this implies that its features are so peculiar it can’t even be named a house, things that often don’t fit in cause contrasting ideas but many people disagree with it because they fear change. By it simply being a “building”, it leaves the reader to wonder who lives there and why is it like that because we are only left with a description and this is what feeds s into the mystery. The setting is often used to foreshadow events and this feeling of mystery and fear will be confirmed by actions later shown in the book. The concept of foreshadowing can also be seen through “like a fire in a forest”, this represents the setting of the perfect street in the nasty neighbourhood. By setting the scene with a smile, Stevenson is building a greater sense of the area and is also leaving the reader to wonder who this town represents.

    Stevenson creates a fairly disgusting setting of the house and this is seen through “blistered and distained” when describing the buildings only feature which id “nothing but a door”. Many people fear gory things because it unsettles them and the use of “blistered” creates this disgusting image in the reader’s mind, this causes them to fear the potential nausea created by the door. Stevenson then proceeds to describe the fact there are “marks of prolonged and sordid negligence”, this creates the idea that no one is there to look after it. It can imply that the owner isn’t wealthy as they can’t afford to keep their house impressionable, during the Victorian era you were heavily classed depending on wealth and the majority were poor.

    When describing the area around the house, the book says “tramps slouched into the recess” and this supports the concept of it being a “dingy neighbourhood”. By creating a dirty scene in both the house and around it, Stevenson is creating an image of a dirty area that people avoid because they fear the potential information that tells them why a person would choose to live there and this feeds into the mystery that builds up through the book. Then use of “dingy” implies that the area is dirty and filled with bad people that any normal person would fear, following Lombroso’s theory that all people who appear to look like criminals must live in and around this “dingy neighbourhood”.

    As Enfield and Utterson are passing the house Enfield refers to it as “blackmail house”. By using a narrative to create the setting, Stevenson is giving the reader a character to listen to and replicate their fear or approach to the mysterious house. The process of “blackmail” brings fear to almost anyone because it always has a negative impact and sends them into a panic. The causes you to question who the “blackmail” impacted and continues to create a mystery as to who fits into this setting.

  2. Sam Reynolds says:

    In the novella “The Strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde”, Stevenson uses setting in order to create mystery and fear. One way in which this is done is by the use of the market in the neighbourhood. The markets lively atmosphere and “rows of smiling saleswomen” gives a sense of happiness. However, the market is described to have “shone out in contrast to its dingy neighbourhood”. From this we can see that the market stands out as if it is not supposed to be there. This creates a sense of unease as it is as if the wonderful market is used to cover up the true nature of the neighbourhood. This gives the reader a sense of mystery and fear as they don’t know what, but something is wrong about the neighbourhood.

    Furthermore in Jekyll and Hyde, Stevenson uses the topic of the door and the house in order to implement mystery and fear into the reader. This is done by the way in which Stevenson shifts the readers attention from the bustling and welcoming market, to a “sinister block of buildings” This immediately gives the a shudder of fear as the atmosphere has suddenly gone from warm and happy to dark and moody. This makes the reader feel as if something bad is about to happen. This is also done by the use of the door and its neglect. The quote “[the door] bore in every feature the marks of prolonged and sordid negligence” shows the reader that Hyde does not care about his house and leaves it how it is. This links with Lambroso’s theory that suggests that people were born criminals, and bore marks of “criminal” features. This relates to the house and the door, as they both contain signs of negligence and decay. This foreshadows the character of Hyde as if his house is evil, then he must be evil as well. As this novella was written in Victorian times, this would have related to the readers as they too would have adopted Lambroso’s theory and so seen Hyde as an instant criminalise character.

    Another way in which Stevenson uses setting in order to create mystery is by Utterson’s nightmares after hearing about the girl that was trampled upon by Hyde. Due to Utterson not having met Hyde, he only pictured Hyde as a “faceless creature”. The nightmare is also set down a dark alleyway. This creates a sense of mystery and fear because neither the reader nor Utterson know of Hyde’s appearance and so can only picture Hyde as faceless which creates a fear of the unknown . This relates to the reader at the time as they were too afraid of many faceless horror stories and so could relate to the writer. Moreover, the novella was released in weekly instalments during its time. This means that the readers were only able to read about a chapters a week. This creates further mystery as they will have to wait even longer in order to find out the appearance of Hyde, and may themselves have nightmares because of their curiosity of wanting to meet Hyde, forcing them to buy the latest instalment

  3. jamie woodcock says:

    In the extract mystery and fear is created by settings throughout. “It was two storey’s high; showed no window, nothing but a door on the lower storey and a blind forehead of discoloured wall on the upper”, through this quote you sense the feeling of fear and mystery dust by the house being described. By Stevenson describing the house like this he instantly makes it sound haunted and horrible, by Stevenson doing this it makes the reader feel worried and fearful of what may come next and by this happening they then get intrigued with the novel and read on. Also by Stevenson creating the sense of fear and mystery, he is then building up the character of Mr.Hyde because he is seen as a mysterious man and no body really knows who he is, until the end. The context of this novel is the Carew murder, so by Stevenson building up fear to represent Mr Hyde then it is clear that the Carew murder is what is linked.

    Stevenson creates mystery and fear in the novel as a whole by using settings throughout the novel as a whole and he does this by building up Mr Hyde’s character and one way he does this using setting is by using the word ‘detestable’ by using this word it shows how horrible and unliked he is just by one look at him. The scene where Mr. Hyde tramples on a young girl, Mr Enfield witnessed that and he used the word detestable to talk about Mr Hyde and this gives the reader an impression of him already without any evidence and proof of seeing him yet. This creates fear and mystery because firstly the reader wants to know more about Hyde and yet they’re feared of who he is because of one thing he done, this makes them want to know more and Stevenson gives little thoughts and evidence each chapter, which keeps the reader engaged with the novel. The context throughout is the Carew murder, so this is Stevenson’s way of building Mr Hyde’s character up.

    Stevenson describes the setting in the extract which creates fear and mystery by “the schoolboy had tried his knife on the mouldings and for close on a generation, no one had appeared to drive away these random visitors or to repair their ravages.” By Stevenson making this house seem like it’s haunted and mysterious, Stevenson has made it much more fearful and mysterious because he is making the reader understand more about Mr Hyde each time even if they didn’t know it. The use of the setting makes the whole novel sound scary and Stevenson uses this very well. Mystery is created through ” no one had appeared to drive away these random visitors or to repair their ravages”, through this quote you can see that we do not know who lives in this house and that the person who’s house that is, is rarely their or they just do not come outside, now the reader does nit know this yet, so it creates mystery. By using the object ‘knife’ in the extract does not create fear because us as the reader instantly thinks why has a schoolboy got knife, where did he get this from? Questions are going through the readers head and this yet again creates the context of the Carew murder and how a knife was used by Mr.Hyde to kill the man and this use of the object used in both cases, show the link between the context.

    In conclusion throughout Jekyll and Hyde Stevenson creates mystery and fear by the use of settings very well and he makes the reader feel like they want to know more

  4. Will Laird says:

    In Jekyll & Hyde the use of setting to create mystery and fear is a common theme throughout. In chapter 1 Stevenson uses the technique of juxtaposition to refer to the street that Utterson and Enfield were walking down near Mr Hyde’s house in Soho. Utterson refers to the street as “a by-street in a busy quarter of London” but then states it was “small and quiet”. By contradicting these two settings it makes the reader begin to question how these two opposing settings can in anyway be linked to one another without all being well and makes them want to know what is going to happen. By referring to the street as “small and quiet”, both of which are adjectives, we can see how a little insignificant street to them, in a big vibrant area of London, can be of huge significance in the view of the reader. As we are reading from Utterson’s point of view, with him being the narrator of the story, we can see how suspicious it all seems to appear to him.
    Yet as the chapter goes on it becomes apparent that the street is one that stands out from the surroundings around it, the area of Soho which was renowned for famine, high levels of poverty and low levels of acceptable living standards. This street is portrayed as one that “shone out in contrast to its dingy neighbourhood”. This creates mystery and fear as it makes it appear that something isn’t right creating the idea the street isn’t where it should be. This would spark fear to the reader in 19th century Britain because to them this wouldn’t be how a neighbourhood should appear in reality and may begin to feel as if something out of the ordinary is going to happen. By using two contrasting adjectives; shine and dingy, this could give the impression of two different lives in one form, much like Jekyll and Hyde. This setting of mystery could, although not evidently clear at first, give away a spoiler for the end of the book as in chapter 10 we know that Jekyll reveals to Utterson through a letter that him and Hyde were the same person. I think by doing this Stevenson is able to get the outcome of story to light at the beginning to tease the reader and make them give their own judgement before the end- hence the idea of mystery.
    Stevenson also creates the idea of mystery throughout the book through the way he portrays the difference between the houses of Jekyll and Hyde. Jekyll’s “grand house” compared to Hyde’s “discoloured” home. This setting of houses creates mystery as we can see the major contrast between the being’s life as both Jekyll and Hyde which makes the reader question why someone would out themselves through living a life of misery when they’re really from the upper class. In Victorian times it was common for the richer, upper class gentleman to not interact with the lower classes. Therefore a “highly respectable man” like Jekyll living in a neighbourhood of “dingy” measures is something that nobody would have been able to predict happening which could have led him into doing what he did which may be why nobody was able to catch or see that it was Jekyll all along.
    At the beginning of the novella Stevenson uses setting to show off the first time we meet Edward Hyde through a flashback. Hyde is seen “trampling a young girl” in front of Jekyll’s house, although this isn’t clear to Lanyon, in which Hyde goes to get a cheque which is singed in Henry Jekyll’s name. From this the reader is instantly able to see that Jekyll and Hyde have links but by setting the incident near Jekyll’s house will make the reader ask questions as to why the incident took place near Jekyll’s house creating a sense of curiosity as to what their links are and what significance this plays for the rest of the novella. By using the verb “trampled” to refer to the incident of Jekyll’s house as something that could be considered as “pure evil” can suggest to the reader that this incident happening near Jekyll’s home was more than a mere coincidence and in fact everything said about Jekyll and how he was a “highly respectable man” could be the complete opposite to what we are seeing. Although this is at the start of the play where t is impossible for us to know for sure that they are the same person, we are able to get hints from the settings and contrasting ideas of how London was portrayed compared to how it actually was. This sense of curiosity makes the reader want to read on and subsequently answer all the questions they want answered.
    In Jekyll & Hyde the use of setting to create mystery and fear is a common theme throughout. In chapter 1 Stevenson uses the technique of juxtaposition to refer to the street that Utterson and Enfield were walking down near Mr Hyde’s house in Soho. Utterson refers to the street as “a by-street in a busy quarter of London” but then states it was “small and quiet”. By contradicting these two settings it makes the reader begin to question how these two opposing settings can in anyway be linked to one another without all being well and makes them want to know what is going to happen. By referring to the street as “small and quiet”, both of which are adjectives, we can see how a little insignificant street to them, in a big vibrant area of London, can be of huge significance in the view of the reader. As we are reading from Utterson’s point of view, with him being the narrator of the story, we can see how suspicious it all seems to appear to him.
    Yet as the chapter goes on it becomes apparent that the street is one that stands out from the surroundings around it, the area of Soho which was renowned for famine, high levels of poverty and low levels of acceptable living standards. This street is portrayed as one that “shone out in contrast to its dingy neighbourhood”. This creates mystery and fear as it makes it appear that something isn’t right creating the idea the street isn’t where it should be. This would spark fear to the reader in 19th century Britain because to them this wouldn’t be how a neighbourhood should appear in reality and may begin to feel as if something out of the ordinary is going to happen. By using two contrasting adjectives; shine and dingy, this could give the impression of two different lives in one form, much like Jekyll and Hyde. This setting of mystery could, although not evidently clear at first, give away a spoiler for the end of the book as in chapter 10 we know that Jekyll reveals to Utterson through a letter that him and Hyde were the same person. I think by doing this Stevenson is able to get the outcome of story to light at the beginning to tease the reader and make them give their own judgement before the end- hence the idea of mystery.
    Stevenson also creates the idea of mystery throughout the book through the way he portrays the difference between the houses of Jekyll and Hyde. Jekyll’s “grand house” compared to Hyde’s “discoloured” home. This setting of houses creates mystery as we can see the major contrast between the being’s life as both Jekyll and Hyde which makes the reader question why someone would out themselves through living a life of misery when they’re really from the upper class. In Victorian times it was common for the richer, upper class gentleman to not interact with the lower classes. Therefore a “highly respectable man” like Jekyll living in a neighbourhood of “dingy” measures is something that nobody would have been able to predict happening which could have led him into doing what he did which may be why nobody was able to catch or see that it was Jekyll all along.
    At the beginning of the novella Stevenson uses setting to show off the first time we meet Edward Hyde through a flashback. Hyde is seen “trampling a young girl” in front of Jekyll’s house, although this isn’t clear to Lanyon, in which Hyde goes to get a cheque which is singed in Henry Jekyll’s name. From this the reader is instantly able to see that Jekyll and Hyde have links but by setting the incident near Jekyll’s house will make the reader ask questions as to why the incident took place near Jekyll’s house creating a sense of curiosity as to what their links are and what significance this plays for the rest of the novella. By using the verb “trampled” to refer to the incident of Jekyll’s house as something that could be considered as “pure evil” can suggest to the reader that this incident happening near Jekyll’s home was more than a mere coincidence and in fact everything said about Jekyll and how he was a “highly respectable man” could be the complete opposite to what we are seeing. Although this is at the start of the play where t is impossible for us to know for sure that they are the same person, we are able to get hints from the settings and contrasting ideas of how London was portrayed compared to how it actually was. This sense of curiosity makes the reader want to read on and subsequently answer all the questions they want answered.

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